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American Fire Sprinkler Association – Florida Chapter; Fire Suppression System Seminar Series

October 14th, 2013
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The AFSA Florida Chapter presents it’s week long conference for contractors and fire marshals seeking certification and renewal CEU requirements.  These seminars will feature noted experts Steven Scandaliato and Russ Leavitt speaking on a number of current topics regarding fire suppression systems including design, inspection and testing.  Visit the AFSA Florida Chapter web site for registration and schedule of events.

Seismic Design For Fire Sprinkler Systems – Part 2a: The Objective of Seismic Restraint

January 27th, 2009

Part 2: The Fundamentals of Seismic Design and the Design Features Involved.

Continued from Seismic Design For Fire Sprinkler Systems – Part 1d: A Word About Responsibility

Seismic Design Part 2

In the first part of this series, I discussed the “if” aspect of seismic design for fire sprinkler systems. The article reviewed International Building Code (2003) Section 1614 where the requirement for seismic design is made and each of the six exemptions to this requirement. Now it is time to discuss how to actually do this in your sprinkler system designs.

Let’s first review the process thus far. IBC Section 1621 references a document called ASCE 7, which is published by the American Society of Civil Engineers and used by structural and civil engineers for building component design criteria, among other things. ASCE 7 Chapter 9.6, “Architectural, Mechanical and Electrical Components and Systems,” is where the exemption for fire sprinklers is found if the Seismic Category as determined in IBC is an A or B. (Remember that fire sprinkler systems in Seismic Category C cannot be exempt from the seismic restraint requirement because they are considered life safety systems and therefore are given a higher rating than standard mechanical and electrical systems.) Having determined that seismic design is required, the “how” of the process begins.

A Word About Terminology
While almost everyone is familiar with the concept of sway bracing, it is important to standardize the language of this design process. For years specifying engineers and other entities have referred to seismic design by simply stating “provide earthquake bracing as required” or “sway bracing shall be provided as required in NFPA 13 [Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems]” or “when bracing is required, it shall be installed per NFPA 13.”

I must stress that you immediately remove any such canned or standardized language in your company’s specifications. Such vague wording is very misleading. Seismic design for fire sprinkler systems includes several components in addition to bracing. While bracing is one of the most familiar methods, it certainly does not provide the necessary restraint for a system to meet the level of performance intended.

The Objective of Seismic Restraint
Understanding the purpose behind seismic design is the next step in the process. As with other aspects of sprinkler system design, plenty of gray areas make following the rules difficult. I believe that a designer must understand the overall objective behind a code or standard to better provide a solution for those times when the rules do not readily apply.

The objective of seismic design for a fire sprinkler system is twofold. The first goal is to minimize stresses in piping by providing flexibility and clearances at points where the building is expected to move during an earthquake. The second is to minimize damaging forces by keeping the piping fairly rigid when supported by a building component expected to move as a unit during an earthquake, such as a floor/ceiling assembly. The idea is to design a system that gives and moves as the building is designed to move. You want the system rigid where the building is rigid and flexible where the building is flexible. According to the standards, the
systems attached to the structure of the building all should work together as one unit.

That being the case, let’s look at each element required to make this happen. NFPA 13 Chapter 9.3 is where all the standard installation requirements for seismic design can be found. The chapter is organized by each required category: couplings, separation, clearance, and sway bracing.

Continued at Seismic Design For Fire Sprinkler Systems – Part 2b: Couplings and Seismic Separation